What are eco-villages, and would you live in one? How rising energy bills and the climate emergency are changing our living habits and sending millennials back to nature | Invest Islands
thumbnail

What are eco-villages, and would you live in one? How rising energy bills and the climate emergency are changing our living habits and sending millennials back to nature

guest article

guest article

Eco-villages
The Mandala Eco-Village

Buyers seeking homes with environmentally friendly features have been growing in number and, according to new research, a desire to cut energy costs is a key motivator.

While almost two-thirds of respondents to a survey conducted by JLL in May said that achieving a lower carbon footprint was important to them, saving on energy bills was cited by 82 percent. Some 70 percent of respondents also viewed the energy efficiency and running costs of their home as more important now versus pre-pandemic.

Helen Amos, head of sustainability services at JLL Hong Kong, says well-designed and well-constructed, environmentally friendly homes not only generate operational savings, they also incorporate natural light, improved ventilation, and use sustainable materials, creating a more comfortable, healthier, and more liveable environment.

“Market demand is leading to a change in the approach of architects and developers for both new build and renovation projects, leading them to bring to market projects with genuine green credentials,” she said.

Jack Brown, director of Invest Islands, a land brokerage and development company based in Lombok, Indonesia, with offices in Hong Kong and Australia, has seen the trend for eco-village concepts grow across the Asia-Pacific region.

“In every market, an increasing number of people are seeking eco-sustainable designs and communities, primarily due to the impact of climate change,” he said.

Read more: Eco-friendly Developments

What is an eco-village?

Eco-villages
The Mandala Eco-Village

The perception of living in a more environmentally focused dynamic has been gaining momentum since the start of the pandemic, Brown continued. “However, with so few communities and developments available around the world like this, it’s important that not only are the projects completed but that they live up to their goals of being sustainable.”

Invest Islands has been involved in the development of luxury villas, tented suites, eco-properties, eco-villages, and more recently, a luxury resort with the Gran Melia International brand, with sustainability embedded in every project. It begins with the architecture based on passive design principles and use of sustainable materials, carries through to land preservation, and encompasses green features expected to last across the life cycle of the properties.

The company’s latest project, Mandala Eco-Village in Lombok, is its most ambitious to date. When fully complete by 2027, the 14-hectare (35-acre) estate will comprise around 200 units across two main areas offering either rice field or ocean views. To be built of bamboo as the primary material, the units are customisable with zero waste as the overarching goal.

Only 20 per cent of each plot may be built on, with features to include rainwater collection systems, natural heating, and cooling designs, solar chimneys, ponds and natural materials throughout. Catering to a holistic lifestyle, the village will also have botanic gardens, a yoga retreat, medical clinic, international school, local restaurants, and a community centre.

Brown says nature-based solutions are considered to be an important contributor to sustainable development “and we want to incorporate that in all our projects”.

Buying guide

What you can buy from US$50,000:

A one-bedroom bamboo unit at Mandala Eco-Village in Lombok, Indonesia, plus US$7.4 per sq ft for the land. Two-bedroom designs start at US$75,000 and you’ll get three bedrooms for US$120,000 (unit only). Amenities at the village, slated for completion by 2027, include botanic gardens, a yoga retreat, medical clinic, international school, local restaurants and a community centre.

Article source: SCMP.com – What are eco-villages, and would you live in one? How rising energy bills and the climate emergency are changing our living habits and sending millennials back to nature

Share this post

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on print
Share on email
Close Menu